Crohn's Disease Diagnosis
11 min read

Diagnosing Crohn’s Disease

A Crohn’s Disease diagnosis is one of first struggles Crohn’s Disease patients will struggle as they begin to research what has been causing their symptoms and stomach pain.

Crohn’s Disease is often a result of your immune system taking a hit and causing inflammation in the digestive tract, or an oh-so-kind relative passing along the gene that leads to a Crohn’s Disease Diagnosis.

However, it can be difficult to diagnose, because it doesn’t always attack the same part of the digestive tract for everyone.

Also, there are varied symptoms that can mimic other digestive disorders.

For example, you could be experiencing pain in the abdomen or diarrhea, which are some of the same symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), a more common disorder.

But, it’s not the same thing.

Other diseases and illness can mimic Crohn’s Disease, such as Lyme Disease, tuberculosis and E. Coli.

Yet, the treatments are vastly different.

When diagnosing Crohn’s Disease, it is important to run the course of Crohn’s Disease diagnostic testing when Crohn’s Disease is suspected, because improper treatment can make whatever has invaded your system, worse in the long run.

Helping the Crohn’s Disease Diagnosis Process

The First Step in the Crohn’s Disease Diagnosis Process is to make a doctor’s appointment, particularly with a gastroenterologist or other medical professional trained in identifying Crohn’s Disease and providing a Crohn’s Disease Diagnosis.

Next when you suspect you have Crohn’s Disease and are looking for a potential Crohn’s Disease Diagnosis, it is very important to be honest with your doctor by telling them all the symptoms you are experiencing, even if you don’t think it’s related.

For example, you might not think the cold sore in your mouth has anything to do with the uncontrollable diarrhea or abdominal pain.

But, it might. Canker sores, believe it or not, is a symptom of Crohn’s Disease, and can be a symptom the doctor could utilize in diagnosing Crohn’s Disease.

It’s understandable that some of the Crohn’s Disease symptoms might not be comfortable to talk about, but the more doctor knows, the more than can help and potentially provide a Crohn’s Disease Diagnosis.

Remember, this is your doctor, who is trained to hear this type of sensitive and very private information, not your next-door neighbor.

Possible Diagnosis Testing When Diagnosing Crohn’s Disease

 Your doctor needs to rule out other possibilities before diagnosing Crohn’s Disease with a confirmed Crohn’s Disease Diagnosis. And, this won’t be a one-step process.

You will not simply have blood drawn for an accurate Crohn’s Disease diagnosis. It’s a multi-step process, because your doctor will want to make sure, rather than treat you for something you don’t have in the first place.

This not only could delay in feeling better, but it could also make it worse.

Let’s start with the blood tests. There are two common areas for testing blood. They are:

  • Blood draw: When they draw your blood to test for Crohn’s, they are looking for an infection, anemia, or both. Anemia is when your red blood cell count is low, which carry the oxygen to all your body tissue.
  • Fecal Occult Blood Testing: Your doctor will most likely ask you for a sample of your stool. They will then test to see if there is blood in the stool, because it’s not always visible. However, this is a quick, painless, and easy test.

In addition to blood testing, there are several procedures that your doctor will recommend. They might suggest one, or a combination of the procedures below:

  • Colonoscopy: This is when a flexible, thin, and lighted tube is used with a camera, to view the colon. While they are observing the colon, they will also do a biopsy of the colon tissue, which is taking a small amount of tissue to examine it further in the lab. They are looking for granulomas, which are small clusters of inflamed cells. If they are present, it’s an indicator of Crohn’s Disease.
  • Flexible Sigmoidoscopy: With this process, the doctor will use a flexible, thin, and lighted tube to closer examine the last section of the colon, called the sigmoid.
  • Computerized Tomography: It’s more commonly known as a CT Scan. This is a unique x-ray method which will offer greater detail than a standard x-ray. The bowel and the surrounding tissue are viewed. For the small bowel, a CT enterography is used for a better image, replacing the barium x-rays, which are commonly used in medical facilities.
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Otherwise referred to as an MRI, magnetic resonance imaging utilizes radio waves and magnetic fields to generate comprehensive images of organs and tissue. This procedure is helpful in assessing a fistula near the anal region.
  • Capsule Endoscopy: With this procedure, a capsule, containing a camera, is swallowed, allowing the camera to take photos. You will also wear a belt with a computer, and the images are transmitted to it, downloaded, then reviewed for any signs of Crohn’s. The capsule is excreted painlessly through a bowel movement.
  • Double Balloon Endoscopy: A longer scope might be necessary, if the endoscope can’t reach. This is called a double balloon endoscopy, and often performed if the capsule procedure indicates any abnormalities, yet diagnosis still can’t be confirmed.
  • Small Bowel Imaging: The small bowel isn’t visible during a colonoscopy. So, this imaging will allow it to be examined further by drinking a barium liquid, and taking images through x-ray, MRI, or CT.

The above are all tests and procedures commonly used to diagnose Crohn’s Disease, either on their own, or in a combination of two, or more.

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Don’t Ignore the Symptoms Of Crohn’s Disease

Crohn’s Disease can afflict anyone, but primarily people within the ages of 15-35.

But, that does not mean that young children and older adults are immune to developing it.

Unfortunately, for most children and younger adults, discussing their symptoms can be embarrassing, and lead to them to sit on important information, rather than tell someone.

So, if your child has any of the symptoms that are detectable to an observer, such as chronic abdominal pain, fever, or fatigue, don’t panic.

But also, don’t ignore the possibility of Crohn’s Disease.

If you are considering Crohn’s Disease Treatment outside of prescriptions such as Humira, or conventional treatments, make sure to check out Life Health Centers in Utah that specializes in hyperthermia for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

Diagnosing Crohn’s Disease

A Crohn’s Disease diagnosis is one of first struggles Crohn’s Disease patients will struggle as they begin to research what has been causing their symptoms and stomach pain.

Crohn’s Disease is often a result of your immune system taking a hit and causing inflammation in the digestive tract, or an oh-so-kind relative passing along the gene that leads to a Crohn’s Disease Diagnosis.

However, it can be difficult to diagnose, because it doesn’t always attack the same part of the digestive tract for everyone.

Also, there are varied symptoms that can mimic other digestive disorders.

For example, you could be experiencing pain in the abdomen or diarrhea, which are some of the same symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), a more common disorder.

But, it’s not the same thing.

Other diseases and illness can mimic Crohn’s Disease, such as Lyme Disease, tuberculosis and E. Coli.

Yet, the treatments are vastly different.

When diagnosing Crohn’s Disease, it is important to run the course of Crohn’s Disease diagnostic testing when Crohn’s Disease is suspected, because improper treatment can make whatever has invaded your system, worse in the long run.

Helping the Crohn’s Disease Diagnosis Process

The First Step in the Crohn’s Disease Diagnosis Process is to make a doctor’s appointment, particularly with a gastroenterologist or other medical professional trained in identifying Crohn’s Disease and providing a Crohn’s Disease Diagnosis.

Next when you suspect you have Crohn’s Disease and are looking for a potential Crohn’s Disease Diagnosis, it is very important to be honest with your doctor by telling them all the symptoms you are experiencing, even if you don’t think it’s related.

For example, you might not think the cold sore in your mouth has anything to do with the uncontrollable diarrhea or abdominal pain.

But, it might. Canker sores, believe it or not, is a symptom of Crohn’s Disease, and can be a symptom the doctor could utilize in diagnosing Crohn’s Disease.

It’s understandable that some of the Crohn’s Disease symptoms might not be comfortable to talk about, but the more doctor knows, the more than can help and potentially provide a Crohn’s Disease Diagnosis.

Remember, this is your doctor, who is trained to hear this type of sensitive and very private information, not your next-door neighbor.

Possible Diagnosis Testing When Diagnosing Crohn’s Disease

 Your doctor needs to rule out other possibilities before diagnosing Crohn’s Disease with a confirmed Crohn’s Disease Diagnosis. And, this won’t be a one-step process.

You will not simply have blood drawn for an accurate Crohn’s Disease diagnosis. It’s a multi-step process, because your doctor will want to make sure, rather than treat you for something you don’t have in the first place.

This not only could delay in feeling better, but it could also make it worse.

Let’s start with the blood tests. There are two common areas for testing blood. They are:

  • Blood draw: When they draw your blood to test for Crohn’s, they are looking for an infection, anemia, or both. Anemia is when your red blood cell count is low, which carry the oxygen to all your body tissue.
  • Fecal Occult Blood Testing: Your doctor will most likely ask you for a sample of your stool. They will then test to see if there is blood in the stool, because it’s not always visible. However, this is a quick, painless, and easy test.

In addition to blood testing, there are several procedures that your doctor will recommend. They might suggest one, or a combination of the procedures below:

  • Colonoscopy: This is when a flexible, thin, and lighted tube is used with a camera, to view the colon. While they are observing the colon, they will also do a biopsy of the colon tissue, which is taking a small amount of tissue to examine it further in the lab. They are looking for granulomas, which are small clusters of inflamed cells. If they are present, it’s an indicator of Crohn’s Disease.
  • Flexible Sigmoidoscopy: With this process, the doctor will use a flexible, thin, and lighted tube to closer examine the last section of the colon, called the sigmoid.
  • Computerized Tomography: It’s more commonly known as a CT Scan. This is a unique x-ray method which will offer greater detail than a standard x-ray. The bowel and the surrounding tissue are viewed. For the small bowel, a CT enterography is used for a better image, replacing the barium x-rays, which are commonly used in medical facilities.
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Otherwise referred to as an MRI, magnetic resonance imaging utilizes radio waves and magnetic fields to generate comprehensive images of organs and tissue. This procedure is helpful in assessing a fistula near the anal region.
  • Capsule Endoscopy: With this procedure, a capsule, containing a camera, is swallowed, allowing the camera to take photos. You will also wear a belt with a computer, and the images are transmitted to it, downloaded, then reviewed for any signs of Crohn’s. The capsule is excreted painlessly through a bowel movement.
  • Double Balloon Endoscopy: A longer scope might be necessary, if the endoscope can’t reach. This is called a double balloon endoscopy, and often performed if the capsule procedure indicates any abnormalities, yet diagnosis still can’t be confirmed.
  • Small Bowel Imaging: The small bowel isn’t visible during a colonoscopy. So, this imaging will allow it to be examined further by drinking a barium liquid, and taking images through x-ray, MRI, or CT.

The above are all tests and procedures commonly used to diagnose Crohn’s Disease, either on their own, or in a combination of two, or more.

Don’t Ignore the Symptoms Of Crohn’s Disease

Crohn’s Disease can afflict anyone, but primarily people within the ages of 15-35.

But, that does not mean that young children and older adults are immune to developing it.

Unfortunately, for most children and younger adults, discussing their symptoms can be embarrassing, and lead to them to sit on important information, rather than tell someone.

So, if your child has any of the symptoms that are detectable to an observer, such as chronic abdominal pain, fever, or fatigue, don’t panic.

But also, don’t ignore the possibility of Crohn’s Disease.

If you are considering Crohn’s Disease Treatment outside of prescriptions such as Humira, or conventional treatments, make sure to check out Life Health Centers in Utah that specializes in hyperthermia for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

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